Altrient Liposomal Vitamin C Leads The Vitamin C Conversation By Launching #Cforyourself Campaign

  • 2020 has seen more press coverage about vitamin C than ever
  • Hospitals all over the world are initiating clinical trials with vitamin C
  • LivOn Labs, pioneers of liposomal vitamin C see global surge in demand
  • Altrient liposomal vitamin c sold out of 3 months stock in 36 hours

 

[September 1st 2020] We are fully stocked and ready for what is expected to be an extremely challenging winter for all of us. To help you navigate the world of vitamin C we are launching an awareness campaign, #Cforyourself, to encourage debate and deeper understanding about how vitamin C may be able to offer added support in the months ahead.

It’s no surprise that the events of 2020 have sent vitamin sales soaring, as people look for effective supplements that might help support their immune system and fend off infections. Altrient liposomal vitamin C was already regularly, the best-selling liposomal vitamin C on Amazon before this unusual year sent sales surging into the stratosphere creating a supply chain delay that generated a 12 week waiting list thousands long.

 

Abundance & Health experienced a 1000% increase in demand, with 3 months’ worth of European stock selling out in just 36 hours making Altrient liposomal vitamin C the most coveted vitamin C supplement on the planet.

 

The search for ways to help proactively prevent ill health and bolster the immune system is a constant topic of discussion and debate with more people than ever taking matters into their own hands, seeking out the very best over the counter natural and alternative medicine products for support. Vitamin C has seen a large amount of mainstream global media focus since February 2020, with several hospitals around the world initiating clinical trials involving intravenous vitamin C and doctors in intensive care units coming forward to state publicly that they have been successfully using vitamin C as part of clinical protocols.

 

Through the #Cforyourself campaign we are going to share insightful information about vitamin C, taking a deeper look at the history, the science, the ingredients, Altrient’s cutting-edge liposomal delivery system, why vitamin C is such an important asset in our defence arsenal and why Altrient C is the world’s most advanced vitamin C formula.

 

Biochemists at LivOn Labs in Nevada USA, pioneered the use of cutting-edge Liposomal Encapsulation Technology in the delivery of vitamin C and successfully developed Altrient C, the world’s first premium liposomal vitamin C in 2004, achieving a level of stability and targeted maximised absorption never before accomplished in the vitamin industry.

Dr. Thomas E. Levy, world renown vitamin C expert described its absorption as “Comparing the bioavailability of all other oral vitamin C delivery with Altrient’s oral liposomal delivery is like comparing a squirt gun to a fire hose”.

                                                                                                    

LivOn Labs have spent the past 16 years perfecting the formulation and patenting the process, on a constant mission to ensure unrivalled purity, potency and efficacy. Altrient C has undergone 2 double-blind placebo-controlled studies one on its ability to achieve maximised absorption and the other on its beneficial effects on skin showing a 61% increase in skin elasticity by taking 3 Altrient C sachets over 3 months.

 

Altrient C’s other unique features are that is it free from all sugars (glycerine, sucrose, glucose, fructose etc.), artificial sweeteners, flavours and colours, it is non-gmo and vegan. It is also rich in phosphatidylcholine, a molecule that forms a key component of every single cell membrane in the body.
 
Since its launch, word of mouth spread amongst the medical and alternative health communities about Altrient C and the global following grew organically to include A list stars such as The Kardashians, Gwyneth Paltrow, Justin Bieber, Bella Hadid and many more major stars who have all taken to social media to share their vitamin C secret. Altrient liposomal vitamin C has been nominated for and won many prestigious awards including most recently being nominated by the editors at British Vogue for a sought-after 2020 Vogue Beauty Award, coming runner up in the Best In Wellness Category.


Here are the vitamin C approved health claims from the European Food Standards Agency:

 

  • Vitamin C contributes to the normal function of the immune system
  • Vitamin C contributes to the protection of cells from oxidative stress
  • Vitamin C contributes to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of skin
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of cartilage
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of gums
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of teeth
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of bones
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of blood vessels
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal energy-yielding metabolism
  • Vitamin C contributes to maintain the normal function of the immune system during and  

after intense physical exercise

  • Vitamin C contributes to normal functioning of the nervous system
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal psychological function
  • Vitamin C contributes to the regeneration of the reduced form of vitamin E
  • Vitamin C increases iron absorption

Here is some useful content adapted from the book Primal Panacea by Thomas E. Levy, MD, JD:

The power of vitamin C supplements are often attributed to the nutrient’s role as an antioxidant. That undersells its value; no other antioxidant can perform the many additional physiological and biological roles that vitamin C fills. By learning about these critical functions, you’ll understand why so many people take Vitamin C for immune support.

19 Functions of Vitamin C

  1. Vitamin C supports the production of interferons. Interferons are produced when the presence of pathogens is detected. They facilitate the ability of cells to launch protective cellular defences.

  2. Vitamin C supports the function of Phagocytes. Phagocytes are a type of white blood cell that envelop pathogens and other dangerous particles. Once the invaders are captured in this manner, they are enzymatically digested.

  3. Vitamin C supports the cell-mediated immune system response. There are 2 major ways the body can respond to a pathogen: antibody-mediated immunity and cell-mediated immunity. Cell-mediated response refers to the activation of macrophages, natural killer cells, and antigen-specific T-lymphocytes that attack anything perceived as a foreign agent.

  4. Vitamin C neutralizes oxidative stress by acting as an antioxidant. Oxidative stress has been associated with numerous health threats, which is why so many people take Vitamin C for immune system support when dealing with lifestyle factors that cause oxidative stress.

  5. Vitamin C supports cytokine production by white blood cells. Cytokines are communication proteins released by certain white blood cells that transmit information to other cells, involved in the immune response.

  6. Vitamin C inhibits various forms of T-lymphocyte death. T-lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell. They are an integral part of the cell-mediated immune defence system. Vitamin C helps to support these important immune cells.

  7. Vitamin C supports nitric oxide production by phagocytes. Phagocytes, as discussed in #2, are white blood cells that engulf invading microorganisms. Nitric oxide is produced in large amounts in these cells, and it is one of the agents that help destroy captured pathogens.

  8. Vitamin C supports T-lymphocyte production. As mentioned in #7, these cells are essential to cell-mediated immune responses, and Vitamin C helps support their proliferation.

  9. Vitamin C supports B-lymphocyte production. These white blood cells make antibodies as part of the antibody-mediated immune response. Antibodies are formed in reaction to the initial introduction of an invading pathogen or antigen.

  10. Vitamin C inhibits neuraminidase production. Some pathogenic viruses and bacteria create neuraminidase, an enzyme that keeps them from being trapped in mucus, one of the body’s natural lines of defence. Inhibiting neuraminidase helps the body optimize this defensive mechanism.

  11. Vitamin C supports antibody production and activity. Good antibody function is important to a normal immune system.

  12. Vitamin C supports natural killer cell activity. Natural killer cells are lymphocytes that can actively seek out damaged or mutated cells and destroy them.

  13. Vitamin C supports localised generation and interaction with hydrogen peroxide. Vitamin C and hydrogen peroxide are effective against microorganisms, helping to dissolve microorganisms and can dissolve the protective capsules of some bacteria.

  14. Vitamin C supports cyclic GMP levels in lymphocytes. Cyclic GMP plays a central role in the regulation of many physiologic responses, including the modulation of immune responses. Cyclic GMP is important for normal cell proliferation and differentiation. It helps oversee the action of many hormones, and it appears to contribute to the mechanisms involved in the relaxation of smooth muscle.

  15. Vitamin C helps to counterbalance some of the harmful effects of histamine. This effect is important in the support of local immune factors.

  16. Vitamin C supports the mucolytic effect. This natural compound helps liquefy thick secretions, increasing the effectiveness of a normal immune response.

  17. Vitamin C impacts the permeability of bacterial membranes more permeable to some antibiotics.

  18. Vitamin C supports prostaglandin formation. Prostaglandins are hormone-like compounds that influence many physiologic processes, including regulating T-lymphocyte function.

  19. Vitamin C concentrates in white blood cells. Some of the primary cells in the immune system concentrate Vitamin C as much as 80 times higher than the level in plasma.

 


REFERENCES:
[1] Siegel B, “Enhanced interferon response to murine leukemia virus by ascorbic acid” Infection and Immunity 1974 10(2):409-410.
[2] Siegel B, “Enhancement of interferon production by poly(rI)-poly(rC) in mouse cell cultures by ascorbic acid” Nature 1975 254(5500):531-532.
[3] Geber W, Lefkowitz S, Hung C, “Effect of ascorbic acid, sodium salicylate, and caffeine on the serum interferon level in response to viral infection” Pharmacology 1975 13(3):228-233.
[4] Dahl H ,Degre M, “The effect of ascorbic acid on production of human interferon and the antiviral activity in vitro. Acta Pathologica et Microbiologica Scandinavica. Section B” Microbiology 1976 84(5):280-284.
[5] Stone I, “The possible role of mega-ascorbate in the endogenous synthesis of interferon” Medical Hypotheses 1980 6(3):309-314.
[6] Karpinska T, Kawecki Z, Kandefer-Szerszen M, “The influence of ultraviolet irradiation, L-ascorbic acid and calcium chloride on the induction of interferon in human embryo fibroblasts” Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis 1982 30(1-2)33-37.
[7] Nungester W, Ames A, “The relationship between ascorbic acid and phagocytic activity” Journal of Infectious Diseases 1948 83:50-54.
[8] Goetzl E, et al, “Enhancement of random migration and chemotactic response of human leukocytes by ascorbic acid” The Journal of Clinical Investigation 1974 53(3):813-818.
[9] Sandler J, Gallin J, Vaughan M, “Effects of serotonin, carbamylcholine, and ascorbic acid on leukocyte cyclic GMP and chemotaxis” The Journal of Cell Biology 1975 67(2 Pt 1):480-484.
[10] Boxer L, et al, “Correction of leukocyte function in Chediak-Higashi syndrome by ascorbate” The New England Journal of Medicine 1976 295(19):1041-1045.
[11] Ganguly R, Durieux M, Waldman R, “Macrophage function in vitamin C-deficient guinea pigs” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1976 29(7):762-765.
[12] Anderson R, Dittrich O, “Effects of ascorbate on leucocytes. Part IV. Increased neutrophil function and clinical improvement after oral ascorbate in 2 patients with chronic granulomatous disease” South African Medical Journal 1979 56(12):476-480.
[13] Anderson R, Theron A, “Effects of ascorbate on leucocytes. Part III. In vitro and in vivo stimulation of abnormal neutrophil motility by ascorbate” South African Medical Journal 1979 56(11):429-433.
[14] Anderson R, et al, “The effects of increasing weekly doses of ascorbate on certain cellular and humoral immune functions in normal volunteers” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1980 33(1):71-76.
[15] Anderson R, et al, “The effect of ascorbate on cellular humoral immunity in asthmatic children” South African Medical Journal 1980 58(24):974-977.
[16] Dallegri F, Lanzi G, Patrone F, “Effects of ascorbic acid on neutrophil locomotion” International Archives of Allergy and Applied Immunology 1980 61(1):40-45.
[17] Corberand J, et al, “Malignant external otitis and polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration impairment. Improvement with ascorbic acid” Archives of Otolaryngology 1982 108(2):122-124.
[18] Patrone F, et al, “Effects of ascorbic acid on neutrophil function. Studies on normal and chronic granulomatous disease neutrophils” Acta Vitaminologica et Enzymologica 1982 4(1-2):163-168.
Cunningham-Rundles S, “Effects of nutritional status on immunological function” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1982 35(5 Suppl):1202-1210.
[19] Oberritter H, et al, “Effect of functional stimulation on ascorbate content in phagocytes under physiological and pathological conditions” International Archives of Allergy and Applied Immunology 1986 81(1):46-50.
[20] Levy R, Schlaeffer F, “Successful treatment of a patient with recurrent furunculosis by vitamin C: improvement of clinical course and of impaired neutrophil functions” International Journal of Dermatology 1993 32(11):832-834.
[21] Levy R, et al, “Vitamin C for the treatment of recurrent furunculosis in patients with impaired neutrophil functions” The Journal of Infectious Diseases 1996 173(6):1502-1505.
[22] Ciocoiu M, et al, “The involvement of vitamins C and E in changing the immune response” [Article in Romanian] Revista Medico-Chirurgicala a Societatii de Medici si Naturalisti din Iasi 1998 102(1-2):93-96.
De la Fuente M, et al, “Immune function in aged women is improved by ingestion of vitamins C and E” Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology 1998 76(4):373-380.
[23] Glick D, Hosoda S, “Histochemistry. LXXViii. Ascorbic acid in normal mast cells and macrophages and neoplastic mast cells” Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 1965 119:52-56.
[24] Thomas W, Holt P, “Vitamin C and immunity: an assessment of the evidence” Clinical and Experimental Immunology 1978 32(2):370-379.
[25] Evans R, Currie L, Campbell A, “The distribution of ascorbic acid between various cellular components of blood, in normal individuals, and its relation to the plasma concentration” The British Journal of Nutrition 1982 47(3):473-482.
[26] Goldschmidt M, “Reduced bactericidal activity in neutrophils from scorbutic animals and the effect of ascorbic acid on these target bacteria in vivo and in vitro” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1991 54(6 Suppl):1214S-1220S.
[27] Washko P, Wang Y, Levine M, “Ascorbic acid recycling in human neutrophils” The Journal of Biological Chemistry 1993 268(21):15531-15535.
[28] Siegel B, Morton J, “Vitamin C and the immune response” Experientia 1977 33(3):393-395.
Jeng K, et al, “Supplementation with vitamins C and E enhances cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in healthy adults” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1996 64(6):960-965.
Campbell J, et al, “Ascorbic acid is a potent inhibitor of various forms of T cell apoptosis” Cellular Immunology 1999 194(1):1-5.
[29] Mizutani A, et al, “Ascorbate-dependent enhancement of nitric oxide formation in activated macrophages. Nitric Oxide: Biology and Chemistry 1998 2(4):235-241.
[30] Mizutani A. Tsukagoshi N, “Molecular role of ascorbate in enhancement of NO production in activated macrophage-like cell line, J774.1” Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology 1999 45(4):423-435.
[31] Fraser R, et al, “The effect of variations in vitamin C intake on the cellular immune response of guinea pigs” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1980 33(4):839-847.
Kennes B, et al, “Effect of vitamin C supplements on cell-mediated immunity in old people” Gerontology 1983 29(5):305-310.
[32] Wu C, Dorairajan T, Lin T, “Effect of ascorbic acid supplementation on the immune response of chickens vaccinated and challenged with infectious bursal disease virus” Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology 2000 74(1-2):145-152.
[33] Schwager J, Schulze J, “Influence of ascorbic acid on the response to mitogens and interleukin production of porcine lymphocytes” International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research 1997 67(1):10-16.
[34] Rotman D, “Sialoresponsin and an antiviral action of ascorbic acid” Medical Hypotheses 1978 4(1):40-43.
[35] Ecker E, Pillemer L, “Vitamin C requirement of the guinea pig” Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 1940 44:262.
[36] Bourne G, “Vitamin C and immunity” The British Journal of Nutrition 1949 2:342.
Prinz W, et al, “The effect of ascorbic acid supplementation on some parameters of the human immunological defence system” International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research 1977 47(3):248-257.
[37] Vallance S, “Relationships between ascorbic acid and serum proteins of the immune system” British Medical Journal 1977 2(6084):437-438.
[38] Sakamoto M, et al, “The effect of vitamin C deficiency on complement systems and complement components” Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology 1981 27(4):367-378.
Feigen G, et al, “Enhancement of antibody production and protection against systemic anaphylaxis by large doses of vitamin C” Research Communications in Chemical Pathology and Pharmacology 1982 38(2):313-333.
[39] Li Y, Lovell T, “Elevated levels of dietary ascorbic acid increase immune responses in channel catfish” The Journal of Nutrition 1985 115(1):123-131.
[40] Wahli T, Meier W, Pfister K, “Ascorbic acid induced immune-mediated decrease in mortality in Ichthyophthirius multifiliis infected rainbow-trout (Salmo gairdneri)” Acta Tropica 1986 43(3):287-289.
[41] Johnston C, Kolb W, Haskell B, “The effect of vitamin C nutriture on complement component C1q concentrations in guinea pig plasma” The Journal of Nutrition 1987 117(4):764-768.
[42] Haskell B, Johnston C, “Complement component C1q activity and ascorbic acid nutriture in guinea pigs” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1991 54(6 Suppl):1228S-1230S.
[43] Wu C, Dorairajan T, Lin T, “Effect of ascorbic acid supplementation on the immune response of chickens vaccinated and challenged with infectious bursal disease virus” Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology 2000 74(1-2):145-152.
[44] Heuser G, Vojdani A, “Enhancement of natural killer cell activity and T and B cell function by buffered vitamin C in patients exposed to toxic chemicals: the role of protein kinase-C” Immunopharmacology and Immunotoxicology 1997 19(3):291-312.
[45] Horrobin D, et al, “The nutritional regulation of T lymphocyte function” Medical Hypotheses 1979 5(9):969-985.
[46] Scott J, “On the biochemical similarities of ascorbic acid and interferon” Journal of Theoretical Biology 1982 98(2):235-238.
[47] Siegel B, Morton J, “Vitamin C and immunity: influence of ascorbate on prostaglandin E2 synthesis and implications for natural killer cell activity” International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research 1984 54(4):339-342.
[48] Atkinson J, et al, “Effects of ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate on cyclic nucleotide metabolism in human lymphocytes” Journal of Cyclic Nucleotide Research 1979 5(2):107-123.
[49] Panush R, et al, “Modulation of certain immunologic responses by vitamin C. III. Potentiation of in Vitro and in vivo lymphocyte responses” International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research. Supplement 1982 23:35-47.
[50] Strangeways W, “Observations on the trypanocidal action in vitro of solutions of glutathione and ascorbic acid” Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 1937 31:405-416.
[51] Miller T, “Killing and lysis of gram-negative bacteria through the synergistic effect of hydrogen peroxide, ascorbic acid, and lysozyme” Journal of Bacteriology 1969 98(3):949-955.
[52] Tappel A, “Lipid peroxidation damage to cell components” Federation Proceedings 1973 32(8):1870-1874.
[53] Kraut E, Metz E, Sagone A, “In vitro effects of ascorbate on white cell metabolism and the chemiluminescence response” Journal of the Reticuloendothelial Society 1980 27(4):359-366.
[54] Robertson W, Ropes M, Bauer W, “The degradation of mucins and polysaccharides by ascorbic acid and hydrogen peroxide” The Biochemical Journal 1941 35:903.
[55] Nandi B, et al, “Effect of ascorbic acid on detoxification of histamine under stress conditions” Biochemical Pharmacology 1974 23(3):643-647.
[56] Johnston C, Martin L, Cai X, “Antihistamine effect of supplemental ascorbic acid and neutrophil chemotaxis” Journal of the American College of Nutrition 1992 11(2):172-176.
[57] Kastenbauer S, et al, “Oxidative stress in bacterial meningitis in humans” Neurology 2002 58(2):186-191.
[58] Versteeg J, “Investigations on the effect of ascorbic acid on antibody production in rabbits after injection of bacterial and viral antigens by different routes. Proceedings of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen. Series C” Biological and Medical Sciences 1970 73(5):494-501.
[59] Banic S, “Immunostimulation by vitamin C” International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research. Supplement 1982 23:49-52.
[60] Wu C, Dorairajan T, Lin T, “Effect of ascorbic acid supplementation on the immune response of chickens vaccinated and challenged with infectious bursal disease virus” Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology 2000 74(1-2):145-152.
[61] Ericsson Y, “The effect of ascorbic acid oxidation on mucoids and bacteria in body secretions” Acta Pathologica et Microbiologica Scandinavica 1954 35:573-583.
[62] Rawal B, “Bactericidal action of ascorbic acid on Pseudomonas aeruginosa: alteration of cell surface as a possible mechanism” Chemotherapy 1978 24(3):166-171.

  • 2020 has seen more press coverage about vitamin C than ever
  • Hospitals all over the world are initiating clinical trials with vitamin C
  • LivOn Labs, pioneers of liposomal vitamin C see global surge in demand
  • Altrient liposomal vitamin c sold out of 3 months stock in 36 hours

 

[September 1st 2020] We are fully stocked and ready for what is expected to be an extremely challenging winter for all of us. To help you navigate the world of vitamin C we are launching an awareness campaign, #Cforyourself, to encourage debate and deeper understanding about how vitamin C may be able to offer added support in the months ahead.

It’s no surprise that the events of 2020 have sent vitamin sales soaring, as people look for effective supplements that might help support their immune system and fend off infections. Altrient liposomal vitamin C was already regularly, the best-selling liposomal vitamin C on Amazon before this unusual year sent sales surging into the stratosphere creating a supply chain delay that generated a 12 week waiting list thousands long.

 

Abundance & Health experienced a 1000% increase in demand, with 3 months’ worth of European stock selling out in just 36 hours making Altrient liposomal vitamin C the most coveted vitamin C supplement on the planet.

 

The search for ways to help proactively prevent ill health and bolster the immune system is a constant topic of discussion and debate with more people than ever taking matters into their own hands, seeking out the very best over the counter natural and alternative medicine products for support. Vitamin C has seen a large amount of mainstream global media focus since February 2020, with several hospitals around the world initiating clinical trials involving intravenous vitamin C and doctors in intensive care units coming forward to state publicly that they have been successfully using vitamin C as part of clinical protocols.

 

Through the #Cforyourself campaign we are going to share insightful information about vitamin C, taking a deeper look at the history, the science, the ingredients, Altrient’s cutting-edge liposomal delivery system, why vitamin C is such an important asset in our defence arsenal and why Altrient C is the world’s most advanced vitamin C formula.

 

Biochemists at LivOn Labs in Nevada USA, pioneered the use of cutting-edge Liposomal Encapsulation Technology in the delivery of vitamin C and successfully developed Altrient C, the world’s first premium liposomal vitamin C in 2004, achieving a level of stability and targeted maximised absorption never before accomplished in the vitamin industry.

Dr. Thomas E. Levy, world renown vitamin C expert described its absorption as “Comparing the bioavailability of all other oral vitamin C delivery with Altrient’s oral liposomal delivery is like comparing a squirt gun to a fire hose”.

                                                                                                    

LivOn Labs have spent the past 16 years perfecting the formulation and patenting the process, on a constant mission to ensure unrivalled purity, potency and efficacy. Altrient C has undergone 2 double-blind placebo-controlled studies one on its ability to achieve maximised absorption and the other on its beneficial effects on skin showing a 61% increase in skin elasticity by taking 3 Altrient C sachets over 3 months.

 

Altrient C’s other unique features are that is it free from all sugars (glycerine, sucrose, glucose, fructose etc.), artificial sweeteners, flavours and colours, it is non-gmo and vegan. It is also rich in phosphatidylcholine, a molecule that forms a key component of every single cell membrane in the body.
 
Since its launch, word of mouth spread amongst the medical and alternative health communities about Altrient C and the global following grew organically to include A list stars such as The Kardashians, Gwyneth Paltrow, Justin Bieber, Bella Hadid and many more major stars who have all taken to social media to share their vitamin C secret. Altrient liposomal vitamin C has been nominated for and won many prestigious awards including most recently being nominated by the editors at British Vogue for a sought-after 2020 Vogue Beauty Award, coming runner up in the Best In Wellness Category.


Here are the vitamin C approved health claims from the European Food Standards Agency:

 

  • Vitamin C contributes to the normal function of the immune system
  • Vitamin C contributes to the protection of cells from oxidative stress
  • Vitamin C contributes to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of skin
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of cartilage
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of gums
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of teeth
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of bones
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of blood vessels
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal energy-yielding metabolism
  • Vitamin C contributes to maintain the normal function of the immune system during and  

after intense physical exercise

  • Vitamin C contributes to normal functioning of the nervous system
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal psychological function
  • Vitamin C contributes to the regeneration of the reduced form of vitamin E
  • Vitamin C increases iron absorption

Here is some useful content adapted from the book Primal Panacea by Thomas E. Levy, MD, JD:

The power of vitamin C supplements are often attributed to the nutrient’s role as an antioxidant. That undersells its value; no other antioxidant can perform the many additional physiological and biological roles that vitamin C fills. By learning about these critical functions, you’ll understand why so many people take Vitamin C for immune support.

19 Functions of Vitamin C

  1. Vitamin C supports the production of interferons. Interferons are produced when the presence of pathogens is detected. They facilitate the ability of cells to launch protective cellular defences.

  2. Vitamin C supports the function of Phagocytes. Phagocytes are a type of white blood cell that envelop pathogens and other dangerous particles. Once the invaders are captured in this manner, they are enzymatically digested.

  3. Vitamin C supports the cell-mediated immune system response. There are 2 major ways the body can respond to a pathogen: antibody-mediated immunity and cell-mediated immunity. Cell-mediated response refers to the activation of macrophages, natural killer cells, and antigen-specific T-lymphocytes that attack anything perceived as a foreign agent.

  4. Vitamin C neutralizes oxidative stress by acting as an antioxidant. Oxidative stress has been associated with numerous health threats, which is why so many people take Vitamin C for immune system support when dealing with lifestyle factors that cause oxidative stress.

  5. Vitamin C supports cytokine production by white blood cells. Cytokines are communication proteins released by certain white blood cells that transmit information to other cells, involved in the immune response.

  6. Vitamin C inhibits various forms of T-lymphocyte death. T-lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell. They are an integral part of the cell-mediated immune defence system. Vitamin C helps to support these important immune cells.

  7. Vitamin C supports nitric oxide production by phagocytes. Phagocytes, as discussed in #2, are white blood cells that engulf invading microorganisms. Nitric oxide is produced in large amounts in these cells, and it is one of the agents that help destroy captured pathogens.

  8. Vitamin C supports T-lymphocyte production. As mentioned in #7, these cells are essential to cell-mediated immune responses, and Vitamin C helps support their proliferation.

  9. Vitamin C supports B-lymphocyte production. These white blood cells make antibodies as part of the antibody-mediated immune response. Antibodies are formed in reaction to the initial introduction of an invading pathogen or antigen.

  10. Vitamin C inhibits neuraminidase production. Some pathogenic viruses and bacteria create neuraminidase, an enzyme that keeps them from being trapped in mucus, one of the body’s natural lines of defence. Inhibiting neuraminidase helps the body optimize this defensive mechanism.

  11. Vitamin C supports antibody production and activity. Good antibody function is important to a normal immune system.

  12. Vitamin C supports natural killer cell activity. Natural killer cells are lymphocytes that can actively seek out damaged or mutated cells and destroy them.

  13. Vitamin C supports localised generation and interaction with hydrogen peroxide. Vitamin C and hydrogen peroxide are effective against microorganisms, helping to dissolve microorganisms and can dissolve the protective capsules of some bacteria.

  14. Vitamin C supports cyclic GMP levels in lymphocytes. Cyclic GMP plays a central role in the regulation of many physiologic responses, including the modulation of immune responses. Cyclic GMP is important for normal cell proliferation and differentiation. It helps oversee the action of many hormones, and it appears to contribute to the mechanisms involved in the relaxation of smooth muscle.

  15. Vitamin C helps to counterbalance some of the harmful effects of histamine. This effect is important in the support of local immune factors.

  16. Vitamin C supports the mucolytic effect. This natural compound helps liquefy thick secretions, increasing the effectiveness of a normal immune response.

  17. Vitamin C impacts the permeability of bacterial membranes more permeable to some antibiotics.

  18. Vitamin C supports prostaglandin formation. Prostaglandins are hormone-like compounds that influence many physiologic processes, including regulating T-lymphocyte function.

  19. Vitamin C concentrates in white blood cells. Some of the primary cells in the immune system concentrate Vitamin C as much as 80 times higher than the level in plasma.

 


REFERENCES:
[1] Siegel B, “Enhanced interferon response to murine leukemia virus by ascorbic acid” Infection and Immunity 1974 10(2):409-410.
[2] Siegel B, “Enhancement of interferon production by poly(rI)-poly(rC) in mouse cell cultures by ascorbic acid” Nature 1975 254(5500):531-532.
[3] Geber W, Lefkowitz S, Hung C, “Effect of ascorbic acid, sodium salicylate, and caffeine on the serum interferon level in response to viral infection” Pharmacology 1975 13(3):228-233.
[4] Dahl H ,Degre M, “The effect of ascorbic acid on production of human interferon and the antiviral activity in vitro. Acta Pathologica et Microbiologica Scandinavica. Section B” Microbiology 1976 84(5):280-284.
[5] Stone I, “The possible role of mega-ascorbate in the endogenous synthesis of interferon” Medical Hypotheses 1980 6(3):309-314.
[6] Karpinska T, Kawecki Z, Kandefer-Szerszen M, “The influence of ultraviolet irradiation, L-ascorbic acid and calcium chloride on the induction of interferon in human embryo fibroblasts” Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis 1982 30(1-2)33-37.
[7] Nungester W, Ames A, “The relationship between ascorbic acid and phagocytic activity” Journal of Infectious Diseases 1948 83:50-54.
[8] Goetzl E, et al, “Enhancement of random migration and chemotactic response of human leukocytes by ascorbic acid” The Journal of Clinical Investigation 1974 53(3):813-818.
[9] Sandler J, Gallin J, Vaughan M, “Effects of serotonin, carbamylcholine, and ascorbic acid on leukocyte cyclic GMP and chemotaxis” The Journal of Cell Biology 1975 67(2 Pt 1):480-484.
[10] Boxer L, et al, “Correction of leukocyte function in Chediak-Higashi syndrome by ascorbate” The New England Journal of Medicine 1976 295(19):1041-1045.
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