Sausage, bacon and onion bake … try it with sautéed spinach

Do you know – you really don’t need to serve a ‘mash’ with sausages, why not try them with some sautéed spinach!

Ingredients
Serves Four
8 good-quality pork sausages
8 rashers streaky bacon
2 red onions cut into eighths
15 sage leaves
2 Tbsp. duck fat
1 cup Verjuice or white wine (optional)
2 Tbsp. butter
150g baby spinach
salt and black pepper

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 220ºC.
2. Wrap a piece of bacon around each sausage. Place in a roasting tin with the onions and sage leaves; spoon over the duck fat, especially over the onions.
3. Roast for 30–40 minutes on the middle rack, turning once, until the sausages are browned and cooked through.
4. Deglaze the pan with the Verjuice or wine and reduce until thickened.
5. Heat the butter in a pan; add the spinach and sauté until just wilted; season well.

To serve

Serve sausages drizzled with gravy, and with sautéed spinach on the side.

From a recipe seen here
If you need help with measurement / conversion see here


Did you know – Spinach is available all year round but is in season during the spring (March – June). It is well known for its nutritional qualities and has always been regarded as a plant with remarkable abilities to restore energy, increase vitality and improve the quality of the blood. There are sound reasons why spinach would produce such results, primarily the fact that it is rich in iron.


Iron plays a central role in the function of red blood cells which help in transporting oxygen around the body, in energy production and DNA synthesis.

Spinach is also an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C and folic acid as well as being a good source of manganese, magnesium, iron and vitamin B2. Vitamin K is important for maintaining bone health and it is difficult to find vegetables richer in vitamin K than spinach. Others include kale, broccoli and green cabbage.

We bring a variety of recipe ideas and articles to this blog, and not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter. If you have any concerns about your health, it is always advisable to consult your doctor or health care team.

All the best Jan

Do you know – you really don’t need to serve a ‘mash’ with sausages, why not try them with some sautéed spinach!

Ingredients
Serves Four
8 good-quality pork sausages
8 rashers streaky bacon
2 red onions cut into eighths
15 sage leaves
2 Tbsp. duck fat
1 cup Verjuice or white wine (optional)
2 Tbsp. butter
150g baby spinach
salt and black pepper

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 220ºC.
2. Wrap a piece of bacon around each sausage. Place in a roasting tin with the onions and sage leaves; spoon over the duck fat, especially over the onions.
3. Roast for 30–40 minutes on the middle rack, turning once, until the sausages are browned and cooked through.
4. Deglaze the pan with the Verjuice or wine and reduce until thickened.
5. Heat the butter in a pan; add the spinach and sauté until just wilted; season well.

To serve

Serve sausages drizzled with gravy, and with sautéed spinach on the side.

From a recipe seen here
If you need help with measurement / conversion see here


Did you know – Spinach is available all year round but is in season during the spring (March – June). It is well known for its nutritional qualities and has always been regarded as a plant with remarkable abilities to restore energy, increase vitality and improve the quality of the blood. There are sound reasons why spinach would produce such results, primarily the fact that it is rich in iron.


Iron plays a central role in the function of red blood cells which help in transporting oxygen around the body, in energy production and DNA synthesis.

Spinach is also an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C and folic acid as well as being a good source of manganese, magnesium, iron and vitamin B2. Vitamin K is important for maintaining bone health and it is difficult to find vegetables richer in vitamin K than spinach. Others include kale, broccoli and green cabbage.

We bring a variety of recipe ideas and articles to this blog, and not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter. If you have any concerns about your health, it is always advisable to consult your doctor or health care team.

All the best Jan