Surrey Yew Tree named as ‘Tree of the Year’

Do you like trees? To me there is something very special about them and today I am sharing a post about the recent Woodland’s Trust ‘Tree of the year’ competition.

The Woodland Trust is the largest woodland conservation charity in the United Kingdom and is concerned with the creation, protection, and restoration of native woodland heritage. It has planted over 50 million trees since 1972.

Tree of the Year: ‘Magnificent’ Surrey yew wins vote


The Waverley Abbey yew tree has been described as “spectacular”
(photograph credit Woodland Trust)

A “magnificent” Surrey yew tree, which is thought to be more than 500 years old, has recently been named the Woodland Trust’s Tree of the Year.

The tree is growing in the grounds of the ruined Waverley Abbey near Farnham, Surrey.

A Portal Tree in Midlothian and a horse chestnut tree in Derbyshire were voted second and third respectively.

The competition aims to highlight how important trees are in the battle against
climate change, the organisers said.

Tom Reed from the Woodland Trust said: “It is great to see that this magnificent tree has been recognised as Tree of the Year 2022 and the way the tree is rooted within the ruins of the abbey is a great symbol of the fact that our ancient trees are intertwined with other aspects of our cultural heritage.”

The yew will go on to represent the UK in the European Tree of the Year competition.


The yew tree at Waverley Abbey is thought to be about 500 years old
(photograph credit Woodland Trust)

The roots of the yew are growing into and around the ruins of the English Heritage site, Waverley Abbey – the first Cistercian monastery founded in Britain 900 years ago, the Woodlands Trust said.

Dr Michael Carter, English Heritage senior properties historian, added that the tree was a “truly spectacular reminder of the passage of time and a very worthy winner of tree of the year”.


There were twelve finalists for the ‘tree of the year’ and you can see and read more here

Related Post

The Mighty Oak Tree and Acorns For Food – read it here


~ xx oo xx ~

Dear reader, this blog is presented in a magazine style – we hope something for everyone. You will find a variety of articles, studies, thoughts, photographs, music and recipes!

Please note, not all recipe suggestions may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter. If you have any concerns about your health, it is always advisable to consult your doctor or health care team.


All the best Jan

Do you like trees? To me there is something very special about them and today I am sharing a post about the recent Woodland’s Trust ‘Tree of the year’ competition.

The Woodland Trust is the largest woodland conservation charity in the United Kingdom and is concerned with the creation, protection, and restoration of native woodland heritage. It has planted over 50 million trees since 1972.

Tree of the Year: ‘Magnificent’ Surrey yew wins vote


The Waverley Abbey yew tree has been described as “spectacular”
(photograph credit Woodland Trust)

A “magnificent” Surrey yew tree, which is thought to be more than 500 years old, has recently been named the Woodland Trust’s Tree of the Year.

The tree is growing in the grounds of the ruined Waverley Abbey near Farnham, Surrey.

A Portal Tree in Midlothian and a horse chestnut tree in Derbyshire were voted second and third respectively.

The competition aims to highlight how important trees are in the battle against
climate change, the organisers said.

Tom Reed from the Woodland Trust said: “It is great to see that this magnificent tree has been recognised as Tree of the Year 2022 and the way the tree is rooted within the ruins of the abbey is a great symbol of the fact that our ancient trees are intertwined with other aspects of our cultural heritage.”

The yew will go on to represent the UK in the European Tree of the Year competition.


The yew tree at Waverley Abbey is thought to be about 500 years old
(photograph credit Woodland Trust)

The roots of the yew are growing into and around the ruins of the English Heritage site, Waverley Abbey – the first Cistercian monastery founded in Britain 900 years ago, the Woodlands Trust said.

Dr Michael Carter, English Heritage senior properties historian, added that the tree was a “truly spectacular reminder of the passage of time and a very worthy winner of tree of the year”.


There were twelve finalists for the ‘tree of the year’ and you can see and read more here

Related Post

The Mighty Oak Tree and Acorns For Food – read it here


~ xx oo xx ~

Dear reader, this blog is presented in a magazine style – we hope something for everyone. You will find a variety of articles, studies, thoughts, photographs, music and recipes!

Please note, not all recipe suggestions may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter. If you have any concerns about your health, it is always advisable to consult your doctor or health care team.


All the best Jan